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Jets > Xtreme A.R.F. T33 Shooting Star

Xtreme A.R.F. T33 Shooting Star

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Xtreme A.R.F. T33 Shooting Star
Xtreme A.R.F. T33 Shooting Star

Xtreme A.R.F. T33 Shooting Star
Specifications

We strive to get our Jets closest possible to the full scale ones, we target
quality and security on all of our airframes. Each Jet is state-of-art build.

Fuselage Length: 2540 mm
Wing Span: 2750 mm
Power Plant: 34 to 45 Lb (16 to 20Kg)
Radio Control: 12 Channels 8 Servos
Color Scheme and finishing according to customer specifications
Description
The T33 Shooting Star is built utilizing advanced composites, forms, ribs, control board and turbine housing are constructed in Carbon Fiber.
Each model are serialized from the beginning to the end for a single customer and it will be shipped with the QC form indicating step by step all the building phases that the plane has undergone, resulting in the final approval and released from the QC department.
Accessories are included on this jet like, undercarriage, air valves, airlines, connectors, bypass etc...
Landing gear, wheels and brakes, doors, and other major components are professionally installed for you.
Spare parts and touch-ups will be sent with the model.
Features:
Choose your color scheme
Scale Landing Gear (Optional)
All Forms are in Carbon Fiber
Operational Scale Canopy(Optional)
Scale Cockpit(Optional)
Too much to say

A little about history
The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 by lengthening the fuselage by slightly over three feet and adding a second seat, instrumentation and flight controls. It was initially designated as a variant of the P-80/F-80, the TP-80C/TF-80C.
Design work for the Lockheed P-80 began in 1943 with the first flight on 8 January 1944. Following on the Bell P-59, the P-80 became the first jet fighter to enter full squadron service in the United States Army Air Forces. As more advanced jets entered service, the F-80 took on another role—training jet pilots. The two-place T-33 jet was designed for training pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft.
Originally designated the TF-80C, the T-33 made its first flight on 22 March 1948 with U.S. production taking place from 1948 to 1959. The US Navy used the T-33 as a land-based trainer starting in 1949. It was designated the TV-2, but was redesignated the T-33B in 1962. The Navy operated some ex-USAF P-80Cs as the TO-1, changed to the TV-1 about a year later. A carrier-capable version of the P-80/T-33 family was subsequently developed by Lockheed, eventually leading to the late 1950s to 1970s T2V-1/T-1A SeaStar. The two prototype TF-80Cs were modified as prototypes for an all-weather two-seater fighter variant which became the F-94 Starfire. A total of 6,557 Shooting Stars were produced, 5,691 by Lockheed, 210 by Kawasaki and 656 by Canadair. U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy[edit] The two-place T-33 proved suitable as an advanced trainer, and it has been used for such tasks as drone director and target towing. The U.S. Air Force began phasing the T-33 out of front line pilot training duties in the Air Training Command in the early 1960s as the Cessna T-37 Tweet and Northrop T-38 Talon aircraft began replacing it under the Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program. The T-33 was used to train cadets from the Air Force Academy at Peterson Field (now Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs). The T-37 replaced the T-33 for Academy training in 1975. Similar replacement also occurred in the U.S. Navy with the TV-1 (also renamed T-33 in 1962) as more advanced aircraft such as the North American T-2 Buckeye and Douglas TA-4 Skyhawk II came on line. USAF and USN versions of the T-33 soldiered on into the 1970s and 1980s with USAF and USN as utility aircraft and proficiency trainers, with some of the former USN aircraft being expended as full scale aerial targets for air-to-air missile tests from naval aircraft and surface-to-air missile tests from naval vessels. Several T-33s were assigned to USAF McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, Convair F-102 Delta Dagger and Convair F-106 Delta Dart units, to include similarly equipped Air National Guard units, of the Aerospace Defense Command as proficiency trainers and practice "bogey" aircraft. Others later went to Tactical Air Command and TAC-gained Air National Guard F-106 and McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom II units in a similar role until they were finally retired.

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Price: $ 4925.00
Call to Order (330-503-3160)


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